Category: Infographics

0
View Article

Does Your Horse Need Electrolytes During the Fall and Winter?

Electrolyte supplementation in colder months depends on how much a horse is being ridden and how well they are drinking. Horses that are ridden lightly a few times a week and drink well probably get suffi­cient electrolytes from hay, concentrate and salt block. Horses that train hard and sweat daily may require a well-formulated electrolyte supplement even in colder months.

» View Article
200
View Article

Recommended nutritional supplement for horses challenged by equine metabolic syndrome and PPID

InsulinWise® A cutting-edge supplement research-proven to support healthy insulin regulation. A synergistic blend of polyphenols and amino acids, including leucine, that supports normal insulin regulation. Research-proven to help maintain healthy body weight and normal fat distribution. Sustains healthy hoof laminae. Ask your vet if InsulinWise is right for your horse.

» View Article
500
View Article

What Should My Horse’s Gut Sound Like?

During a physical exam a veterinarian will listen to your horse’s gut sounds with a stethoscope in the flank area. What lies below the stethoscope? When listening for gut sounds, your veterinarian will evaluate both sides of the horse. The abdomen is divided into four areas or quadrants: left side top and bottom, and right side top and bottom.

» View Article
100
View Article

How to help your horse stay warm in winter

Horses begin to struggle to keep warm below certain critical temperatures. Clipped Horse - Critical temperature is 41°F (5°C) Horse With a Thick Winter Coat - Critical temperature is 18°F (-8°C) The easiest and most effective way to keep your horse warm when the temperatures drop is to feed additional forage.

» View Article
0
View Article

Feeding Horses in Drought Conditions

During drought conditions, pastures may not provide enough fi­ber and energy to meet your horse’s nutrition requirements. Feeding additional hay may be necessary. If additional calories are still needed, consider a high-fat supplement. Horses should consume at least 1.5% to 2% of body weight per day in forage. Supplemental forage in the form of hay or hay cubes may be needed.

» View Article