Keeping skin disease away.

  1. Condition your horses on all different kinds of footing.
  2. Cold winter days are the perfect time to plan for the upcoming season.
  3. Bits and Biting
  4. When learning new things, take baby steps.
  5. Cross training is great for horses of all disciplines.
  6. The Dump and Run
  7. Got pesky skin fungus or rain rot?
  8. Time to get organized!
  9. My horse won’t drink. What should I do?
  10. Like braiding sprays but hate the cost?
  11. Take good care of your trailer and it will take good care of you.
  12. 15-minute sessions with your horse from Perfect Partners Equine
  13. How to fill your hay net the easy way.
  14. Stay positive
  15. Putting Effort Into Relaxation
  16. Does your horse get anxious about jumping?
  17. Be Sure to Smile and Breathe When You Ride.
  18. Travel With an Extra Set of Horse Shoes
  19. Warm-up Strategy for Excitable Horses
  20. Sunscreen Isn’t Just for People.
  21. Hoof packing tricks of the trade.
  22. Expand your horizons.
  23. Save money by cleaning your own blankets.
  24. Keeping skin disease away.
  25. Make your own brush jump
  26. Whoa means whoa and go means go!
  27. Quick and easy manure stain remover.
  28. Nutrition matters!
  29. Do-it-yourself tire changing.
  30. Hey, wait for me!
  31. Do you have a horse that is struggling with skin issues or even thrush?
  32. Keep a journal of what you have learned

By Reese Koffler Stanfield, USDF gold medalist, FEI-certified instructor, owner of Maplecrest Farm

There is nothing worse than dealing with skin crud. To limit your horse’s exposure to the pathogens that cause skin disease, take a few easy steps:

1) Clean your brushes at least once a month. Wash them in hot soapy water, rinse well and lay them in the sun to dry. Wash the container they live in as well.

2) Have your blankets cleaned at the end of each season.

3) Don’t share personal items like brushes, boots, sheets, saddle pads and tack among your horses. If you must share, wash the items between horses.

4) Make sure your horse is completely dry before replacing blankets or sheets.

5) Rub down the face and legs with a towel after rinsing or washing. Get them as dry as possible.

6) Check your horse for skin crud daily and treat outbreaks immediately.

Just a little effort on your part will greatly reduce the risk of your horse developing skin crud. In the long run it will save you time and money and make your horse much happier.

About Reese:

Reese Koffler-Stanfield is a lifelong professional horseman and United States Dressage Federation (USDF) bronze, silver, gold, and gold freestyle bar medalist. Reese operates Maplecrest Farm in Georgetown, Kentucky, a state-of-the-art training facility dedicated to boarding, training, care, and sale of performance horses and sport horses. As a USDF/FEI certified instructor/trainer, she works with a host of talented riders and horses. Reese is also the host of the Horse Radio Network’s Dressage Radio Show. If you have questions for Reese, you can contact her at reese@horseradionetwork.com.

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