Goatzilla™: Concentrated energy and protein supplement for goats

Goatzilla is a unique, research-proven supplement that safely provides energy and protein to your breeding and show goats. This palatable supplement supports urinary tract health by reducing the risk of urinary calculi formation, also known as urolithiasis. Because Goatzilla does not include ammonium chloride, there is no chance for ammonium toxicity.  Goatzilla was formulated by leading goat nutritionist Dr. Greg Pollard.

“Goatzilla is a revolutionary supplement that increases dietary energy, provides natural protein and yeast culture, and effectively increases the acidity of the diet without the risk of ammonia toxicity.”

– Dr. Greg Pollard, Texas State University

– Formulated by leading goat nutritionist, Dr. Greg Pollard, Texas State University

Breeding Goats

Does expend a lot of energy during pregnancy and lactation and they require the extra calories provided by Goatzilla.

Does are tremendous mothers, both before and after birth. Because twin, triplet, and quadruplet births are not uncommon among does, the physiological toll and energy requirements of the developing fetuses can sap a doe of the calories she consumes. If sufficient calories are not provided in her ration, a condition called pregnancy toxemia might develop. Inadequate nutrition during late pregnancy is the primary cause of pregnancy toxemia. Like many other mammals, the majority of fetal growth in goats occurs in late pregnancy. Following kidding, does must produce sufficient milk to adequately support the growth of her kids. Goatzilla increases the energy density of the feed so does have more calories at their disposal during late gestation and lactation.

Frequently Asked Questions

When should I start my doe on Goatzilla?

Does should be started on Goatzilla during late gestation. They benefit most from being fed Goatzilla throughout their time in kidding pens and through at least the first month of lactation.

Does Goatzilla safely provides energy for breeding bucks too?

Yes. Bucks use more energy posturing and preparing for breeding season than they do actually breeding does. Much effort and aggression is used during this “rutting” period, and bucks often lose a tremendous amount of body condition. Despite being offered sufficient feed, owners sometimes find it difficult to maintain weight on bucks throughout breeding season.

When is the best time to supplement my buck with Goatzilla?

Bucks should be fed Goatzilla two weeks prior to the initiation of breeding season, through the duration of the breeding season, and then about a month after breeding season.

How much should I feed and how should I feed Goatzilla?

Goatzilla should be fed to adult goats at the rate of 4 ounces (1 scoop) per goat. Goatzilla can be fed with a fortified diet without upsetting the balance of trace minerals. Goatzilla is a palatable meal, which prevents sorting by goats. This meal can be blended into either pelleted or textured feed.

What happens if I just increase the amount of grain I am feeding to my breeding stock?

In an effort to offset the weight loss caused by this increased workload, breeders will often overfeed grain and underfeed roughage. This sets the stage for urinary calculi formation and the health risks associated with it. Feeding Goatzilla allows a breeder to provide additional energy without overfeeding grain. Additionally, Goatzilla will support normal urinary pH and decrease the risks of urinary calculi formation.

What do you mean when you say Goatzilla is research-proven?

In controlled studies conducted at Texas State University by Dr. Greg Pollard, goats fed Goatzilla did not have a single incidence of urinary calculi, but goats fed a similar diet without Goatzilla had urinary calculi occurrences between 25%-38%. Goatzilla is a revolutionary supplement that increases dietary energy, provides natural protein and yeast culture, and effectively increases the acidity of the diet without the risk of ammonia toxicity.

Show Goats

Show goats benefit from a high-protein, high-fat diet.

Goatzilla provides show goats with a high-protein diet that supports muscular development. It is the ideal supplement for adding maximal finish to a goat’s condition and shine to his coat. When combined with sufficient exercise, Goatzilla packs the nutritional punch necessary to finish out your goat for the show ring.

Frequently Asked Questions

How should I feed Goatzilla?

Goatzilla should be fed to adult goats at the rate of 4 ounces (1 scoop) per goat. Goatzilla can be fed with a fortified diet without upsetting the balance of trace minerals. Goatzilla is a palatable meal, which prevents sorting by goats. This meal can be blended into either pelleted or textured feed. Goatzilla should be added to the diet when additional calories are needed to put condition on your goat.

Can’t I get the same results by just feeding my goat more grain?

In an effort to put condition on a goat, owners may overfeed grain and underfeed roughage. This sets the stage for urinary calculi formation and the health risks associated with it. Feeding Goatzilla allows an owner to provide additional energy and protein without overfeeding grain. Additionally, Goatzilla will support normal urinary pH and decrease the risks of urinary calculi formation.

What do you mean when you say Goatzilla is research-proven?

In controlled studies conducted at Texas State University by Dr. Greg Pollard, goats fed Goatzilla did not have a single incidence of urinary calculi, but goats fed a similar diet without Goatzilla had urinary calculi occurrences between 25-38%.

Research

Based on university research and feeding experiences, the incidence of urinary calculi can be reduced or eliminated completely with proper urine acidification in ruminants. The most common method of urine acidification to date has been the addition of ammonia-containing products (ammonium chloride or ammonium sulfate) to the diet; however, over-supplementing with these types of products is risky because of the possibility of ammonia toxicity.

In controlled studies conducted at Texas State University by Dr. Greg Pollard, goats fed Goatzilla did not have a single incidence of urinary calculi, but goats fed a similar diet without Goatzilla had urinary calculi occurrences between 25%-38%.

Dr. Pollard has more than 10 years of experience in nutritional management of small ruminants with a special emphasis on meat goats. He has conducted research specifically focused on improving meat goat performance and production. During this time, Dr. Pollard has actively consulted the feed industry on proper nutritional guidelines and feed formulations for small ruminant animals. Over the course of his career, his work has been widely published in academic journals.

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